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Naval Dirk

A Dirk is a long dagger often carried by officers
and midshipmen as a personal weapon for use in
close combat such as ship boarding. The word "dirk"
comes from Scottish language. It is often used as
a synonym for dagger. The word dates back to around
1600 and may be a version of the Dutch word dolk.
They were often made from broken weapons. They
were used to signify an office of importance
without the pedigree of a commissioned officer
because a non-commissioned officer would not be
permitted to carry a full sword or sabre.
Used as a functional weapon, dirks were popular throughout
history all the way up to World War II where Japanese had
similar weapons for dress and use.
The designs have changed little in the past 500 or so
years that they have been popular. With the advent of
modern weaponry, though, they have been relegated to
more of an ornamental piece for formal uniforms, especially
with naval officers in almost >every navy around the globe.
Brimstone Forge's Naval Dirk is a functional replica
weapon but has the flare of an ornamental piece as well.
With a blade made of A36 Carbon steel and a stainless
steel guard, it is as stout as any dirk. The curved blade
was fashionable and desireable due to it's Middle Eastern
appearance and would have been popular in the early 19th
century during the time Napoleon was conducting his
campaigns in Europe.
The full tang extends completely through the maple
handle for strength and balance and then wrapped
in leather using wire cording with leather lanyards
as bolsters for comfort.
The finished product has a polished blade and guard.
The wire cording provides a contrast to the black
leather grip for a functional Naval Dirk that can
serve as a formal piece for dress and show.












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